TRUSSES AND FRAMES VIVA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

TRUSSES AND FRAMES VIVA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


Q: What is a truss?

A: A truss is a structure composed of straight members connected at joints. It is designed to carry loads primarily through axial forces in its members.

Q: What are the main components of a truss?

A: The main components of a truss are the members (also called elements or bars) and the joints (also called nodes or connections). The members are the straight structural elements, while the joints are the points where the members intersect and connect.

Q: What is the difference between a truss and a frame?

A: The primary difference between a truss and a frame is how they resist loads. In a truss, the members are primarily subjected to axial forces, while in a frame, the members are subjected to both axial and bending forces.

Q: How is a truss classified based on the arrangement of its members?

A: Trusses can be classified into various types based on the arrangement of their members, such as the Howe truss, Pratt truss, Warren truss, and many more. These classifications depend on the pattern of diagonals and verticals in the truss configuration.

Q: What is the method of joints in truss analysis?

A: The method of joints is a technique used to analyze trusses by considering the equilibrium of forces at each joint. By applying the principles of statics and resolving forces at each joint, the internal forces in the truss members can be determined.

Q: What is the method of sections in truss analysis?

A: The method of sections is a technique used to analyze trusses by considering the equilibrium of forces in a selected section of the truss. By isolating a portion of the truss and analyzing the forces acting on it, the internal forces in specific members can be determined.

Q: What is meant by stability in truss analysis?

A: Stability in truss analysis refers to the ability of a truss to maintain its structural integrity and resist collapse under the applied loads. A stable truss does not experience excessive displacements or deformations that could lead to failure.

Q: What are the assumptions made in truss analysis?

A: Some common assumptions made in truss analysis include:

The truss members are connected by frictionless pins or hinges at the joints.


The truss is loaded only at the joints.

The members are assumed to be perfectly rigid and capable of carrying only axial forces.

The truss is in a state of static equilibrium.

The weight of the truss itself is negligible.

Q: What is a statically determinate truss?

A: A statically determinate truss is a truss that can be analyzed using the equations of static equilibrium alone. The internal forces in all members of a statically determinate truss can be determined by solving a set of equilibrium equations.

Q: What is a statically indeterminate truss?

A: A statically indeterminate truss is a truss that cannot be analyzed using the equations of static equilibrium alone. Additional equations, such as compatibility equations or deformation equations, are required to determine the internal forces in the members.

Q: How is the load distribution in a truss determined?

A: The load distribution in a truss is determined by considering the applied loads and the stiffness of the truss members. The load is transferred through the truss members to the supports based on the relative stiffness of each member.

Q: What is a pin-jointed truss?

A: A pin-jointed truss is a type of truss where the members are connected together at their ends by frictionless pins or hinges. These pins allow the members to rotate freely, resulting in axial forces in the members.

Q: What is the method of virtual work in truss analysis?

A: The method of virtual work is a technique used to analyze trusses by considering the virtual displacements of the truss members. By equating the virtual work done by the applied loads to zero, the internal forces in the members can be determined.

Q: What is the difference between a stable truss and a statically determinate truss?

A: A stable truss refers to a truss that is capable of maintaining its equilibrium and structural integrity, while a statically determinate truss is one that can be analyzed using static equilibrium equations alone.

Q: What are the common types of loads that act on trusses?

A: Common types of loads that act on trusses include point loads, distributed loads, concentrated moments, and temperature changes leading to thermal expansion or contraction.

Q: How do you determine the reactions at the supports of a truss?

A: The reactions at the supports of a truss can be determined by applying the principles of static equilibrium. By considering the sum of forces and moments acting on the truss, the reactions at the supports can be calculated.

Q: What is the difference between an ideal truss and a real-world truss?

A: An ideal truss assumes that the members are perfectly straight, all joints are frictionless, and the loads are applied only at the joints. In reality, truss members may have some imperfections, joints may exhibit some friction or flexibility, and loads can be distributed along the members.

Q: How does the choice of truss configuration affect its performance?

A: The choice of truss configuration affects its performance in terms of load-carrying capacity, stiffness, and structural efficiency. Different configurations can distribute loads and forces differently, influencing the overall behavior of the truss.

Q: What is a frame?

A: A frame is a structural system composed of interconnected members that are capable of carrying and transmitting loads. Frames are typically subjected to both axial and bending forces in their members.

Q: What are the primary differences between a plane truss and a space truss?

A: A plane truss lies in a two-dimensional plane, while a space truss extends in three dimensions. Space trusses have additional members and joints, providing increased stability and load-carrying capacity compared to plane trusses.

Q: How can you determine the stability of a truss or frame?

A: The stability of a truss or frame can be determined by analyzing its internal forces and displacements. If the internal forces remain within the strength limits of the members and the displacements are within acceptable limits, the truss or frame can be considered stable.

Q: What is the method of consistent deformations in truss analysis?

A: The method of consistent deformations is a technique used to analyze trusses by considering the compatibility of deformations between adjacent members. By assuming a consistent deformation pattern, the internal forces in the members can be determined.

Q: What is the difference between an under-determined and an over-determined truss?

A: An under-determined truss is a truss that has fewer support reactions than the number of unknown member forces, making it impossible to solve for all the member forces. An over-determined truss, on the other hand, has more support reactions than the number of unknown member forces, resulting in redundancy.

Q: How do you calculate the deflection of a truss member?

A: The deflection of a truss member can be calculated using principles of structural analysis, such as the equation of static equilibrium or the principle of virtual work. By considering the applied loads, member stiffness, and boundary conditions, the deflection can be determined.

Q: What are the advantages of using trusses in structural design?

A: Some advantages of using trusses in structural design include:

Trusses can span large distances with minimal material, resulting in lightweight structures.


Trusses allow for efficient load distribution and can handle both axial and bending forces.

Trusses are modular and can be prefabricated, making them easier to transport and assemble on-site.

Trusses offer design flexibility with various configurations to suit different structural requirements.

Trusses can be analyzed and designed using established engineering principles.

Q: What are the disadvantages of using trusses in structural design?

A: Some disadvantages of using trusses in structural design include:

Trusses require careful analysis and design to ensure their stability and load-carrying capacity.


Trusses can be sensitive to changes in load distribution, and redistributing loads may require modification of the truss configuration.

Trusses may not be aesthetically pleasing for certain architectural designs.

Trusses can be more expensive than other structural systems in certain cases.

Trusses may require specialized expertise for their design, fabrication, and installation.

Q: What is the difference between a determinate and indeterminate frame?

A: A determinate frame is a frame in which the reactions and internal forces can be determined solely by applying the equations of static equilibrium. An indeterminate frame, however, requires additional analysis methods such as the slope-deflection method or the moment distribution method to determine the internal forces.

Q: How does the choice of materials affect the behavior of trusses and frames?

A: The choice of materials for trusses and frames affects their behavior in terms of strength, stiffness, and durability. Different materials have varying mechanical properties, such as strength-to-weight ratio, elasticity, and resistance to corrosion, which can influence the performance and design of trusses and frames.

Q: What are some practical applications of trusses and frames?

A: Trusses and frames find practical applications in various fields, including:

Roof structures in buildings and stadiums.


Bridge construction.

Support structures for cranes and industrial equipment.

Transmission towers and antenna masts.

Exhibition and event structures.

Aircraft and spacecraft frameworks.

Truss-based scaffolding systems.

Q: What is the difference between a statically determinate truss and a statically indeterminate truss?

A: A statically determinate truss is a truss where the equilibrium equations alone are sufficient to determine all the member forces and reactions. In contrast, a statically indeterminate truss has more unknown member forces than the number of equilibrium equations available, requiring additional methods such as the flexibility or stiffness methods to solve.

Q: How do you calculate the support reactions in a truss or frame?

A: The support reactions in a truss or frame can be calculated by considering the equilibrium of forces and moments. By summing the forces and moments acting on the structure, and applying the conditions of equilibrium, the reactions at the supports can be determined.

Q: What is the difference between a simple truss and a compound truss?

A: A simple truss consists of triangular elements and does not contain any individual member that is subdivided by additional joints. In contrast, a compound truss contains additional members that are subdivided by intermediate joints, resulting in a more complex configuration.

Q: How do you determine the maximum load-carrying capacity of a truss?

A: The maximum load-carrying capacity of a truss is determined by identifying the critical members or joints that are subjected to the highest internal forces. By comparing these forces to the material strength or allowable stress, the maximum load-carrying capacity can be determined.

Q: What is the difference between an internal force and an external force in truss analysis?

A: In truss analysis, internal forces refer to the forces that develop within the truss members due to the applied external loads. External forces, on the other hand, are the loads and reactions that are applied directly to the truss structure from external sources.

Q: How does the presence of redundancies affect the analysis of a truss or frame?

A: The presence of redundancies in a truss or frame makes it statically indeterminate and requires additional analysis methods to determine the internal forces. Redundancies provide additional support or load paths, resulting in more unknown forces than the available equilibrium equations.

Q: What is meant by the stability of a frame?

A: The stability of a frame refers to its ability to maintain equilibrium and resist collapse under the applied loads. It ensures that the frame remains in a safe and functioning state, without experiencing excessive displacements or deformations that could lead to failure.

Q: How can you increase the stiffness of a truss or frame?

A: The stiffness of a truss or frame can be increased by using members with higher modulus of elasticity, increasing the cross-sectional area of the members, or adding additional bracing elements. Increasing the stiffness enhances the structural rigidity and reduces deflections.

Q: What are the limitations of truss analysis methods?

A: Some limitations of truss analysis methods include:

They assume linear behavior of the members, neglecting geometric nonlinearity or material nonlinearity.


They do not consider the effects of deformations due to shear or torsion.

They assume idealized member connections without considering joint flexibility or imperfections.

They may not accurately predict the behavior of trusses under dynamic or seismic loads.

Q: What are the primary differences between a plane frame and a space frame?

A: A plane frame lies in a two-dimensional plane, while a space frame extends in three dimensions. Space frames have additional members and joints, allowing them to resist loads and forces in multiple directions, making them more structurally efficient than plane frames.

Q: What is the role of bracing in trusses and frames?

A: Bracing is used in trusses and frames to enhance their stability and resist lateral forces, such as wind or seismic loads. Bracing elements are typically added diagonally between members to provide additional stiffness and prevent excessive sway or buckling.

Q: What is the difference between a determinate and indeterminate truss with respect to stability?

A: A determinate truss can be stable if the support conditions and member sizes are appropriately selected to resist the applied loads. In contrast, an indeterminate truss requires additional stability checks due to the presence of redundant members, which can affect the overall stability of the structure.

Q: What is meant by the redundancy in a truss or frame?

A: Redundancy in a truss or frame refers to the presence of extra members or connections that provide multiple load paths or support conditions. It leads to a statically indeterminate structure and requires additional analysis methods to determine the internal forces accurately.

Q: How does temperature variation affect trusses and frames?

A: Temperature variation can cause thermal expansion or contraction of truss and frame members, resulting in changes in their lengths and induced thermal stresses. The design should account for these effects to prevent excessive displacements, stresses, and potential structural failure.

Q: What are the different types of truss connections?

A: Truss connections can be classified into two main types: pinned connections and rigid connections. Pinned connections allow rotation at the joints, while rigid connections prevent rotation and transfer moments between members.

Q: What is meant by the term “member axial force” in truss analysis?

A: The member axial force in truss analysis refers to the force that acts along the length of a truss member due to the applied loads and support reactions. It is responsible for transferring the load between the joints and determines the internal forces within the member.

Q: How does the choice of support conditions affect truss and frame behavior?

A: The choice of support conditions affects the stability, determinacy, and overall behavior of trusses and frames. Different support conditions, such as pin, roller, or fixed supports, introduce different reactions and constraints on the structure, which in turn affect the distribution of internal forces.

Q: What is meant by the term “degree of statical indeterminacy”?

A: The degree of statical indeterminacy refers to the number of redundant or unknown forces in a truss or frame that cannot be determined solely by applying the equations of static equilibrium. It indicates the complexity of the structure and determines the additional analysis methods required.

Q: What are some common failure modes in trusses and frames?

A: Common failure modes in trusses and frames include excessive member deformations, buckling, collapse due to overload, fatigue failure, and joint failures. Proper design, material selection, and regular inspections are necessary to prevent these failure modes.

Q: How can trusses and frames be optimized for structural efficiency?

A: Trusses and frames can be optimized for structural efficiency by selecting appropriate member sizes, configurations, and support conditions. Optimization techniques aim to minimize the weight or cost of the structure while satisfying strength and stability requirements.

Q: What are the advantages of using computer-aided analysis in truss and frame design?

A: Some advantages of using computer-aided analysis in truss and frame design include:

Ability to handle complex and large-scale structures.


Faster and more efficient analysis compared to manual methods.

Consideration of nonlinear effects and material behavior.

Visualization of results and better understanding of structural behavior.

Iterative design optimization to achieve desired performance.

Q: What is the difference between an internal hinge and an external hinge in frames?

A: In frames, an internal hinge refers to a joint within a member where rotation is permitted, allowing for bending deformations. An external hinge, on the other hand, refers to a joint at the end of a member where rotation is allowed, often used to simplify analysis or accommodate construction requirements.

Q: How do you determine the critical load for buckling in truss and frame members?

A: The critical load for buckling in truss and frame members can be determined using buckling analysis methods, such as the Euler’s buckling formula or finite element analysis. These methods take into account member properties, boundary conditions, and loading conditions to calculate the critical buckling load.

Q: What is the significance of the method of joints in truss analysis?

A: The method of joints is a fundamental technique used in truss analysis to determine the internal forces in the members. By analyzing the equilibrium at each joint, the method of joints allows for the determination of member forces and reactions.

Q: How does the presence of initial member forces affect truss and frame analysis?

A: The presence of initial member forces, such as pre-tension or pre-compression, affects the overall behavior and stability of trusses and frames. These initial forces contribute to the internal forces and must be considered in the analysis and design process.

Q: What are the limitations of the method of joints in truss analysis?

A: Some limitations of the method of joints include:

It is primarily applicable to statically determinate trusses.


It may involve a large number of simultaneous equations for complex trusses.

It assumes that the joints are pin-jointed and do not consider the effects of joint flexibility or friction.

Q: What is meant by the term “chord” in truss and frame structures?

A: In truss and frame structures, a chord refers to a horizontal or nearly horizontal member that primarily carries axial forces and resists bending. Chords are typically located at the top and bottom of truss or frame configurations and provide stability and load distribution.

Q: How does the choice of material affect the strength-to-weight ratio of trusses and frames?

A: The choice of material significantly affects the strength-to-weight ratio of trusses and frames. Materials with high strength-to-weight ratios, such as steel or high-strength alloys, allow for lighter and more efficient structural designs compared to materials with lower strength-to-weight ratios.

Q: What is the difference between a rigid frame and a sway frame?

A: A rigid frame is a frame structure that exhibits minimal or negligible deflections under applied loads. It resists lateral forces and moments without significant deformation. A sway frame, on the other hand, is a frame structure that allows for lateral displacements and experiences more significant deflections under lateral loads.

Q: What are the considerations for selecting appropriate member sizes in trusses and frames?

A: Some considerations for selecting member sizes in trusses and frames include:

Required strength and load-carrying capacity.


Deflection and deformation limits.

Buckling resistance.

Cost and availability of materials.

Fabrication and construction


TRUSSES AND FRAMES VIVA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


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