THERMODYNAMICS VIVA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

THERMODYNAMICS VIVA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

What is the first law of thermodynamics?

The first law of thermodynamics is the law of conservation of energy. It states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, but can only be converted from one form to another.

What is the second law of thermodynamics?

The second law of thermodynamics states that the total entropy of an isolated system can never decrease over time. In other words, natural processes tend to move towards states of greater disorder or randomness.

What is entropy?

Entropy is a measure of the amount of disorder or randomness in a system. It is often described as a measure of the number of possible ways that the system can be arranged while still maintaining the same overall properties.

What is an isothermal process?

An isothermal process is a process in which the temperature of a system remains constant while energy is exchanged between the system and its surroundings. This typically involves heat transfer at a constant temperature.

What is an adiabatic process?

An adiabatic process is a process in which no heat is exchanged between the system and its surroundings. This means that the change in energy of the system is entirely due to work done on or by the system.

What is the Carnot cycle?

The Carnot cycle is a theoretical cycle that represents the most efficient way of converting heat energy into work. It consists of four processes: isothermal expansion, adiabatic expansion, isothermal compression, and adiabatic compression.

What is the difference between an open and a closed system?

An open system is one that can exchange matter and energy with its surroundings, while a closed system can only exchange energy. An isolated system cannot exchange either matter or energy with its surroundings.

What is the difference between heat and temperature?

Heat is a form of energy that is transferred between two objects due to a temperature difference. Temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a system, and determines the direction of heat flow.

What is the difference between work and heat?

Work is a form of energy transfer that is associated with a change in the position or motion of an object. Heat is a form of energy transfer that is associated with a temperature difference.

What is the difference between internal energy and enthalpy?

Internal energy is the total energy of the molecules in a system, including kinetic and potential energy. Enthalpy is a measure of the total heat content of a system at constant pressure, and includes both internal energy and the work done by the system on its surroundings.

What is a reversible process?

A reversible process is a process that can be reversed without leaving any trace on the surroundings. It is an idealized process that does not actually occur in nature, but serves as a useful theoretical concept for understanding thermodynamic principles.

What is the difference between a state function and a path function?

A state function is a property that depends only on the current state of the system, such as temperature or pressure, and not on how the system got to that state. A path function, such as work or heat, depends on the specific path taken to get from one state to another.

What is the significance of the critical point in a phase diagram?

The critical point is the point at which the liquid and gas phases of a substance become indistinguishable. Above this point, there is no clear boundary between the liquid and gas phases, and the substance exists as a single phase known as a supercritical fluid.

What is a phase transition?

A phase transition is a physical change that occurs when a substance undergoes a change in its state of matter, such as from solid to liquid or liquid to gas. These transitions typically involve the absorption or release of heat energy.

What is the Clausius-Clapeyron equation?

The Clausius-Clapeyron equation relates the change in pressure with temperature of a substance during a phase transition. It is derived from the second law of thermodynamics and is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a substance at different temperatures.

What is the difference between a reversible and an irreversible process?

A reversible process is one that can be reversed without any loss of energy, while an irreversible process is one that involves a loss of energy due to irreversibilities such as friction, turbulence or heat transfer across a finite temperature difference. Reversible processes are idealized processes that do not occur naturally in practice.

What is the meaning of the term ‘adiabatic’?

The term ‘adiabatic’ means that no heat is exchanged between the system and its surroundings during a process. In other words, the change in energy of the system is entirely due to work done on or by the system.

What is a heat engine?

A heat engine is a device that converts heat energy into mechanical work. The efficiency of a heat engine is determined by the Carnot efficiency, which is the ratio of the work done by the engine to the heat energy absorbed by the engine.

What is a heat pump?

A heat pump is a device that uses mechanical work to transfer heat from a colder environment to a warmer environment. It is essentially the reverse of a refrigeration cycle and is commonly used for heating homes and buildings.

What is the relationship between entropy and the second law of thermodynamics?

The second law of thermodynamics states that the total entropy of an isolated system can never decrease over time. Entropy is a measure of the amount of disorder or randomness in a system, and the second law implies that natural processes tend to move towards states of greater disorder or randomness.

What is the meaning of the term ‘specific heat’?

The term ‘specific heat’ refers to the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of a substance by one degree Celsius. It is a property of the substance that depends on its composition and physical state.

What is the difference between a phase and a component in a system?

A phase is a physically distinct form of matter, such as a solid, liquid or gas. A component, on the other hand, is a chemical species that makes up the system, such as water or carbon dioxide. A system can have multiple phases but only a certain number of components.

What is the meaning of the term ‘heat capacity’?

The term ‘heat capacity’ refers to the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of an entire system by one degree Celsius. It is a measure of the total amount of energy stored in a system that can be released or absorbed as heat.

What is the difference between a closed and an open thermodynamic system?

A closed thermodynamic system is one that can exchange energy with its surroundings but not matter, while an open system can exchange both energy and matter with its surroundings.

What is the meaning of the term ‘enthalpy’?

The term ‘enthalpy’ refers to the total heat content of a system at constant pressure. It includes both the internal energy of the system and the work done by the system on its surroundings.

What is a thermodynamic cycle?

A thermodynamic cycle is a sequence of thermodynamic processes that returns a system to its initial state. The most well-known thermodynamic cycle is the Carnot cycle, which is used as a theoretical basis for understanding the behavior of real-world heat engines.

What is the Joule-Thomson effect?

The Joule-Thomson effect is the phenomenon whereby a gas experiences a temperature change when it is forced through a small hole or valve. This effect is used in industrial refrigeration and liquefaction processes.

What is the definition of a reversible engine?

A reversible engine is an idealized engine that operates in a perfectly reversible manner, such that it can be reversed without leaving any trace on the surroundings. Such engines do not actually exist in practice but serve as a useful theoretical concept for understanding thermodynamic principles.

What is a thermal reservoir?

A thermal reservoir is an idealized heat source or sink that can supply or absorb infinite amounts of heat energy without changing its temperature. This is an important concept in thermodynamics as it allows us to analyze the behavior of real-world systems in terms of idealized components.

What is the definition of an adiabatic wall?

An adiabatic wall is a boundary that does not allow heat transfer between two regions of a thermodynamic system. This means that any energy transfer between the regions must be in the form of work, rather than heat.

What is the difference between an isothermal process and an adiabatic process?

An isothermal process is one in which the temperature of the system remains constant, while an adiabatic process is one in which no heat is exchanged between the system and its surroundings. Both types of processes can be used to perform work on a system, but they have different effects on the internal energy and entropy of the system.

What is the Clausius-Clapeyron equation?

The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is an equation that relates the temperature dependence of the vapor pressure of a substance to its enthalpy of vaporization and the temperature dependence of its molar volume. It is used to predict the boiling point of a substance at different pressures.

What is the definition of the heat of fusion?

The heat of fusion is the amount of heat energy required to melt a unit mass of a substance at its melting point. It is a measure of the energy required to break the intermolecular bonds holding the solid together.

What is the meaning of the term ‘entropy’?

The term ‘entropy’ refers to the degree of disorder or randomness in a system. In thermodynamics, entropy is a measure of the number of possible arrangements of a system that are consistent with its macroscopic state.

What is the difference between a reversible process and an irreversible process?

A reversible process is one that can be reversed without leaving any trace on the surroundings, while an irreversible process is one that cannot be reversed without some permanent change occurring in the surroundings. Reversible processes are idealized concepts used for theoretical analysis, while irreversible processes are more common in real-world systems.

What is the meaning of the term ‘heat engine’?

The term ‘heat engine’ refers to a device that converts heat energy into mechanical work. Examples of heat engines include steam engines, gasoline engines, and turbines.

What is the definition of the Second Law of Thermodynamics?

The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that the total entropy of a closed system can never decrease over time. This means that in any spontaneous process, the entropy of the universe must always increase.

What is the definition of the Third Law of Thermodynamics?

The Third Law of Thermodynamics states that it is impossible to reach absolute zero temperature through any finite number of processes. This means that the entropy of a perfect crystal at absolute zero is zero.

What is the meaning of the term ‘heat pump’?

The term ‘heat pump’ refers to a device that can extract heat from a low-temperature source and transfer it to a higher-temperature sink. This is achieved through a cycle of processes that involve the compression and expansion of a working fluid.

What is the definition of a thermodynamic equilibrium state?

A thermodynamic equilibrium state is a state in which the properties of a system do not change over time, even when in contact with other systems. This is a state of maximum entropy for the system and represents the most probable state of the system.

What is the Carnot cycle?

The Carnot cycle is an idealized thermodynamic cycle that is used as a benchmark for the maximum efficiency of a heat engine. It consists of four reversible processes: isothermal expansion, adiabatic expansion, isothermal compression, and adiabatic compression.

What is the definition of the enthalpy of a system?

The enthalpy of a system is the sum of its internal energy and the product of its pressure and volume. It is a measure of the total heat content of a system.

What is the meaning of the term ‘phase transition’?

The term ‘phase transition’ refers to a change in the physical state of a substance, such as from solid to liquid or liquid to gas. These transitions are characterized by changes in the internal energy, entropy, and other thermodynamic properties of the substance.

What is the definition of the heat capacity of a substance?

The heat capacity of a substance is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of the substance by one degree Celsius. It is a measure of the ability of the substance to store heat energy.

What is the definition of the critical point of a substance?

The critical point of a substance is the temperature and pressure at which the gas and liquid phases of the substance become indistinguishable. At the critical point, the substance exhibits unique properties such as critical density and critical temperature.

What is the meaning of the term ‘adiabatic index’?

The adiabatic index, also known as the ratio of specific heats, is a ratio of the specific heats of a gas at constant pressure and constant volume. It is used to describe the behavior of a gas during adiabatic processes.

What is the definition of the coefficient of thermal expansion?

The coefficient of thermal expansion is a measure of the change in volume of a substance with temperature. It is defined as the fractional change in volume per unit change in temperature.

What is the definition of the internal energy of a system?

The internal energy of a system is the sum of the kinetic and potential energies of its constituent particles. It is a measure of the total energy contained within the system.

What is the meaning of the term ‘enthalpy of reaction’?

The enthalpy of reaction is the change in enthalpy that occurs during a chemical reaction. It is a measure of the heat energy released or absorbed during the reaction.

What is the definition of the thermodynamic state function?

A thermodynamic state function is a property of a system that depends only on its current state and not on how it arrived at that state. Examples of state functions include internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy.

What is the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a system?

The Gibbs free energy of a system is a measure of its ability to do work. It is defined as the difference between the enthalpy and the product of the entropy and the absolute temperature.

What is the definition of the enthalpy of vaporization?

The enthalpy of vaporization is the amount of energy required to convert a unit mass of a liquid into its vapor at constant pressure and temperature.

What is the definition of the entropy of a system?

The entropy of a system is a measure of the degree of randomness or disorder of the system. It is a thermodynamic property that increases with the number of ways in which the system can be arranged.

What is the meaning of the term ‘heat of fusion’?

The heat of fusion is the amount of energy required to convert a unit mass of a solid into a liquid at constant temperature and pressure.

What is the definition of the ideal gas law?

The ideal gas law is a fundamental equation that describes the behavior of ideal gases. It relates the pressure, volume, temperature, and number of moles of a gas according to the equation PV = nRT, where P is the pressure, V is the volume, n is the number of moles, R is the universal gas constant, and T is the temperature.

What is the definition of the heat of formation?

The heat of formation is the change in enthalpy that occurs when a compound is formed from its constituent elements. It is a measure of the heat energy released or absorbed during the formation of a compound.

What is the definition of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation?

The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is a relationship between the vapor pressure, temperature, and enthalpy of vaporization of a substance. It is often used to describe the behavior of substances undergoing a phase transition.

What is the definition of the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation?

The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation is a relationship between the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of a system. It is often used to calculate the temperature dependence of the Gibbs free energy.

What is the meaning of the term ‘latent heat’?

The term ‘latent heat’ refers to the heat energy absorbed or released during a phase transition, such as the melting of ice or the vaporization of water.

What is the definition of the specific heat capacity of a substance?

The specific heat capacity of a substance is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of the substance by one degree Celsius. It is a measure of the ability of the substance to store heat energy per unit mass.

What is the definition of thermodynamic equilibrium?

Thermodynamic equilibrium is a state in which a system is at a uniform temperature and pressure, and all of its physical and chemical properties are constant over time. In this state, there is no net transfer of energy or matter between the system and its surroundings.

What is the definition of the heat capacity of a system?

The heat capacity of a system is the amount of heat energy required to raise its temperature by one degree Celsius. It is a measure of the system’s ability to store thermal energy.

What is the definition of adiabatic process?

An adiabatic process is a thermodynamic process in which there is no heat exchange between the system and its surroundings. In other words, the process is insulated from its surroundings and no heat is added to or removed from the system.

What is the definition of an isothermal process?

An isothermal process is a thermodynamic process in which the temperature of the system remains constant. In this process, any heat added to or removed from the system is compensated by an equal amount of work done by or on the system.

What is the definition of a reversible process?

A reversible process is a thermodynamic process that can be reversed by an infinitesimal change in the system’s variables, such as pressure or temperature. In a reversible process, the system can be returned to its initial state without any loss of energy or entropy.

What is the definition of the Carnot cycle?

The Carnot cycle is a theoretical thermodynamic cycle that describes the maximum efficiency that can be achieved by a heat engine operating between two reservoirs of different temperatures. It consists of four reversible processes: isothermal expansion, adiabatic expansion, isothermal compression, and adiabatic compression.

What is the definition of the Joule-Thomson effect?

The Joule-Thomson effect is a phenomenon in which the temperature of a gas changes when it is expanded or compressed at constant enthalpy. It is a result of the interplay between the gas’s internal energy and its work potential.

What is the definition of the van der Waals equation?

The van der Waals equation is a modification of the ideal gas law that accounts for the attractive forces and finite size of gas molecules. It is commonly used to describe the behavior of real gases.

What is the definition of the Clausius statement of the second law of thermodynamics?

The Clausius statement of the second law of thermodynamics states that it is impossible to transfer heat from a colder body to a hotter body without doing work on the system. This statement is based on the concept of entropy and is a fundamental principle of thermodynamics.

What is the definition of the Kelvin-Planck statement of the second law of thermodynamics?

The Kelvin-Planck statement of the second law of thermodynamics states that it is impossible to construct a heat engine that can convert all of the heat it receives into work. This statement is based on the concept of entropy and is a fundamental principle of thermodynamics.

What is the definition of a thermodynamic system?

A thermodynamic system is a defined region in space that is separated from its surroundings by a boundary. It can exchange energy, mass, and momentum with its surroundings through the boundary.

What is the definition of an open system in thermodynamics?

An open system is a thermodynamic system that can exchange both matter and energy with its surroundings through its boundary.

What is the definition of a closed system in thermodynamics?

A closed system is a thermodynamic system that can exchange energy but not matter with its surroundings through its boundary.

What is the definition of an isolated system in thermodynamics?

An isolated system is a thermodynamic system that cannot exchange either matter or energy with its surroundings through its boundary.

What is the definition of enthalpy?

Enthalpy is a thermodynamic property that accounts for the internal energy of a system as well as the work that can be done by or on the system at constant pressure.

What is the definition of internal energy?

Internal energy is the total energy of a system, including its kinetic and potential energies.

What is the definition of work in thermodynamics?

In thermodynamics, work is defined as the energy transferred to or from a system due to a force acting on it through a distance.

What is the definition of heat in thermodynamics?

Heat is the energy transferred between two objects or systems due to a difference in temperature.

What is the definition of the first law of thermodynamics?

The first law of thermodynamics is a fundamental principle of thermodynamics that states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or converted from one form to another.

What is the definition of entropy?

Entropy is a measure of the degree of disorder or randomness in a system. In thermodynamics, it is a fundamental concept that describes the direction of energy flow and the availability of energy for useful work.

What is the definition of specific heat?

Specific heat is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one unit of mass of a substance by one degree Celsius or Kelvin.

What is the definition of a heat engine?

A heat engine is a device that converts heat energy into mechanical work by utilizing a working substance, such as a gas or a liquid.

What is the definition of a heat pump?

A heat pump is a device that uses mechanical work to transfer heat from a colder region to a warmer region, contrary to the natural direction of heat flow.

What is the definition of a refrigeration system?

A refrigeration system is a heat pump that is used to remove heat from a region at low temperature and reject it to a region at high temperature, allowing for cooling of the low-temperature region.

What is the definition of a phase transition?

A phase transition is a physical change in a substance that results in a change in its state of matter, such as from a solid to a liquid or a liquid to a gas.

What is the definition of the triple point of a substance?

The triple point of a substance is the temperature and pressure at which its solid, liquid, and gas phases coexist in equilibrium.

What is the definition of a critical point?

A critical point is the temperature and pressure at which the distinction between liquid and gas phases of a substance becomes indistinguishable, and the substance exhibits unique properties such as a change in density and surface tension.

What is the definition of a thermodynamic cycle?

A thermodynamic cycle is a series of thermodynamic processes that returns a system to its initial state, and during which a net amount of work is done by or on the system.

What is the definition of the heat transfer coefficient?

The heat transfer coefficient is a measure of the rate at which heat is transferred between a surface and a fluid medium, such as air or water. It depends on various factors such as the properties of the fluid, the flow rate, and the geometry of the surface.

What is the definition of a state function?

A state function is a thermodynamic property that depends only on the current state of a system and not on the path taken to reach that state. Examples of state functions include temperature, pressure, and internal energy.

What is the definition of a reversible process in thermodynamics?

A reversible process is a thermodynamic process that can be reversed in direction by an infinitely small change to any of the parameters, such as temperature or pressure, involved in the process. It is a hypothetical process that occurs in a system that is always in thermodynamic equilibrium.

What is the definition of an irreversible process in thermodynamics?

An irreversible process is a thermodynamic process that cannot be reversed without increasing the entropy of the system or its surroundings. It is a process that occurs in a system that is not in thermodynamic equilibrium.

What is the definition of adiabatic process in thermodynamics?

An adiabatic process is a thermodynamic process that occurs without the transfer of heat between the system and its surroundings. The term “adiabatic” means that the system is insulated, so that there is no exchange of heat between the system and its environment.

What is the definition of isothermal process in thermodynamics?

An isothermal process is a thermodynamic process that occurs at constant temperature. The term “isothermal” means that the system is kept at a constant temperature, and any changes that occur in the system are due to the transfer of energy in the form of work.

What is the definition of isobaric process in thermodynamics?

An isobaric process is a thermodynamic process that occurs at constant pressure. The term “isobaric” means that the system is kept at a constant pressure, and any changes that occur in the system are due to the transfer of energy in the form of work.

What is the definition of isochoric process in thermodynamics?

An isochoric process is a thermodynamic process that occurs at constant volume. The term “isochoric” means that the system is kept at a constant volume, and any changes that occur in the system are due to the transfer of energy in the form of heat or work.

What is the definition of a Carnot cycle?

A Carnot cycle is a theoretical thermodynamic cycle that consists of four reversible processes: two adiabatic and two isothermal processes. It is a cycle that provides the maximum possible efficiency for a heat engine operating between two temperature limits.

What is the definition of a Rankine cycle?

A Rankine cycle is a thermodynamic cycle used in power plants that converts heat into mechanical work by utilizing steam as the working fluid. It consists of four processes: two isentropic and two constant pressure processes.

What is the definition of a Brayton cycle?

A Brayton cycle is a thermodynamic cycle used in gas turbine engines that converts heat into mechanical work by utilizing air as the working fluid. It consists of four processes: two isentropic and two constant pressure processes.

What is the definition of the second law of thermodynamics?

The second law of thermodynamics is a fundamental principle of thermodynamics that states that the total entropy of an isolated system always increases over time, and that it is impossible to convert heat completely into work without producing a net increase in entropy.

What is the definition of the third law of thermodynamics?

The third law of thermodynamics is a fundamental principle of thermodynamics that states that the entropy of a perfect crystal at absolute zero temperature is zero. This means that no system can reach absolute zero temperature, and that as a system approaches absolute zero, its entropy approaches a constant minimum value.

What is the definition of the Gibbs free energy?

The Gibbs free energy is a thermodynamic potential that is used to determine whether a chemical reaction will occur spontaneously at a constant temperature and pressure. It is defined as the difference between the enthalpy and the product of the absolute temperature and the entropy of the system.

What is the definition of the enthalpy?

The enthalpy is a thermodynamic property that is used to measure the heat content of a system at constant pressure. It is defined as the sum of the internal energy and the product of the pressure and volume of the system.

What is the definition of the internal energy?

The internal energy is a thermodynamic property that is used to measure the total energy of a system. It includes the kinetic energy and potential energy of the particles that make up the system, and it is related to the temperature of the system.

What is the definition of the specific heat capacity?

The specific heat capacity is a thermodynamic property that is used to measure the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of a substance by one degree Celsius. It is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of a substance by one degree Celsius.

What is the definition of the latent heat?

The latent heat is the amount of heat required to change the phase of a substance without changing its temperature. It is the energy required to break the intermolecular forces between the particles in a substance during a phase change.

What is the definition of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation?

The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is a relationship between the vapor pressure and temperature of a substance. It states that the logarithm of the vapor pressure is proportional to the reciprocal of the absolute temperature, and it is commonly used to estimate the boiling points of liquids and the sublimation points of solids.

What is the definition of the van der Waals equation?

The van der Waals equation is an equation of state for real gases that accounts for the finite volume of the gas molecules and the attractive forces between the molecules. It is an improvement over the ideal gas law, which assumes that gas molecules have no volume and do not interact with each other.

What is the definition of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution?

The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is a probability distribution that describes the speed distribution of particles in a gas at a given temperature. It shows that the majority of particles in a gas have speeds near the average speed, with fewer particles having higher or lower speeds.

What is the definition of the Carnot cycle?

The Carnot cycle is a theoretical cycle that describes the most efficient possible heat engine that can operate between two given temperature reservoirs. It consists of four reversible processes: two adiabatic processes and two isothermal processes, and it is used as a standard for comparing the efficiency of real heat engines.

What is the definition of the Joule-Thomson effect?

The Joule-Thomson effect is the cooling or heating of a gas when it is expanded or compressed while held at a constant enthalpy. It occurs when a gas is forced through a porous plug or valve, and the temperature change is proportional to the change in pressure.

What is the definition of the Stefan-Boltzmann law?

The Stefan-Boltzmann law is a physical law that describes the amount of radiation emitted by a blackbody as a function of its temperature. It states that the total radiant heat energy emitted per unit area per unit time is proportional to the fourth power of the absolute temperature.

What is the definition of the Planck’s law?

Planck’s law is a fundamental law of physics that describes the spectral density of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a blackbody in thermal equilibrium at a given temperature. It shows that the spectral density of radiation is proportional to the fourth power of the temperature, and it is an important concept in the study of thermodynamics and quantum mechanics.

What is the definition of the Boltzmann constant?

The Boltzmann constant is a physical constant that relates the energy of individual particles in a gas to the temperature of the gas. It is equal to the gas constant divided by Avogadro’s number, and it is used to calculate the average kinetic energy of particles in a gas at a given temperature.

What is the definition of the thermodynamic identity?

The thermodynamic identity is a mathematical expression that relates the changes in entropy, internal energy, and volume of a system to changes in pressure and temperature. It is derived from the first and second laws of thermodynamics and is an important concept in thermodynamics.

What is the definition of the heat capacity ratio?

The heat capacity ratio is the ratio of the specific heats at constant pressure and constant volume for a given substance. It is denoted by the symbol gamma (γ) and is an important parameter in thermodynamics and fluid dynamics.

What is the definition of the Maxwell relations?

The Maxwell relations are a set of partial derivatives that relate the thermodynamic properties of a system, such as the internal energy, entropy, and volume, to each other. They are derived from the fact that the second derivatives of any function are independent of the order of differentiation.

What is the definition of the Gibbs-Duhem equation?

The Gibbs-Duhem equation is a mathematical relationship between the chemical potentials of the components in a thermodynamic system. It states that the sum of the products of the chemical potentials and the number of moles of each component is equal to zero.

What is the definition of the Helmholtz free energy?

The Helmholtz free energy is a thermodynamic potential that is used to determine whether a system can do work at a constant temperature and volume. It is defined as the difference between the internal energy and the product of the absolute temperature and the entropy of the system.

What is the definition of the Maxwell relations?

The Maxwell relations are a set of partial derivatives that relate the thermodynamic properties of a system, such as the internal energy, entropy, and volume, to each other. They are derived from the fact that the second derivatives of any function are independent of the order of differentiation.



THERMODYNAMICS VIVA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


Leave a Comment